Print Friendly, PDF & Email
| add this

2016 Charitable Deductions: Substantiate Them Or Lose Them

Posted on 02/09/17

Sharing your wealth with a favorite charity can benefit those in need and reduce your taxable estate. In addition, your donations can ease your income tax liability. But you must meet IRS substantiation requirements. If you fail to do so, the IRS could deny the corresponding deductions you’re claiming. Let’s take a look at the requirements for different asset types.

Cash gifts

Generally, you can substantiate gifts of less than $250 with a canceled check, written receipt or other reliable record (such as a credit card statement) that indicates the name of the charity and the amount and date of your gift.

If you donate more than $75 in exchange for goods or services other than intangible religious benefits (such as admission to religious ceremonies), the charity must provide you with a statement that 1) advises you that your deduction is limited to the amount by which your gift exceeds the value of those goods and services, and 2) provides a good-faith estimate of that value.

Gifts of $250 or more require a “contemporaneous” written acknowledgment from the charity that includes the amount and date of your gift and the estimated value of any goods or services you received or a statement that no goods or services were received. If goods or services received consisted entirely of intangible religious benefits, a statement to that effect must be included. An email will suffice.

To satisfy the contemporaneous requirement, you must have the acknowledgment in your possession before you file your income tax return. If you file later than the extended due date of your return, you must have received the acknowledgment by that extended due date.

Noncash gifts

If you make noncash gifts totaling more than $500 for the year, you must file Form 8283, “Noncash Charitable Contributions,” with your federal income tax return. And for gifts of property valued at more than $5,000 ($10,000 for closely held stock) you’ll need to obtain a “qualified appraisal” by a “qualified appraiser” and have the appraiser sign Sec. B, Part III, “Declaration of Appraiser.” If property is valued at more than $500,000, you’re required to attach a copy of the appraisal report to your return. No appraisal is required for publicly traded securities, regardless of value.

A qualified appraiser is a professional who meets certain education, experience and accreditation requirements. A qualified appraisal must 1) be prepared, signed and dated by a qualified appraiser other than the taxpayer or the recipient of the donation, 2) be conducted within 60 days of the gift, 3) provide certain information about the property, the appraiser and the valuation methods used, and 4) not involve fees based on a percentage of the appraised value or deduction amount.

Don’t leave it to chance

If you’ve made substantial charitable donations, their deductibility depends on compliance with IRS substantiation rules. Contact us to ensure you’ve properly substantiated your donations and can maximize your deductions on your 2016 income tax return.

Contact Us

location icon

Our Locations

Sarasota Office
1990 Main Street, Suite 801
Sarasota, FL 34236
Phone: 941.365.4617
Toll Free: 800.966.8676
Fax: 941.954.3207

Lakewood Ranch Office
9423 Town Center Parkway
Lakewood Ranch, FL 34202
Phone: 941.365.4617

Tampa Office
4350 West Cypress Street
Meridian One, Suite 930
Tampa, Fl 33607
Phone: 813.675.8800

Lets Get Started.

 

Verification

 
leading edge alliance move project logo green business logo 2016 IPA 200